Preview Mode Links will not work in preview mode

The Pro Audio Suite


A must listen Podcast if you're in audio or voice over. Our panel features industry professionals, George 'The Tech' Whittam, Robert 'Source Connect' Marshall, Andrew 'Realtime Casting' Peters and Darren 'Voodoo Sound' Robertson, plus special guests.

The Life of a Re-Recording Mixer

May 17, 2018

The Pro Audio Suite Podcast is a Bi-Weekly podcast designed for Audio Professionals. With your Hosts George (The Tech) Whittam, Robert Marshall (Audio Engineer/Source Elements Creator/Owner), Andrew Peters (Premier Voice Talent/Co-Owner Realtime Casting), and Darren "Robbo" Robertson  (Studio Owner/Sound Designer), we cover the gamut of Audio issues. From voice Over tips and tools to Project and Professional Studio set up and fit out, to the latest in gear and everything in between.

This week we chat about weird things that can happen to audio files when you send them over the internet, Robbo tells a horror story about a project he was recently involved in, and George reveals the piece of Antique gear that gives his studio it's "sound", and we talk with Re-Recording mixer and Sound Supervisor from LA, David Raines. A fascinating look behind the scenes of Hollywood production, and an amazing story about the recording of the dialogue tracks for the Sean Connery blockbuster "The Hunt FOr Red October".

Find out more about David Here..

Don't forget to like our facebook page 

The Pro Audio Suite Podcast copyright George Whitham, Andrew Peters, Robert Marshall & Darren Robertson.
 
Products or companies we discuss are not paid endorsements. They are not sponsored by, nor do we have any professional or affiliate relationship of any kind with any of the companies or products highlighted in the show.... sadly! It’s just stuff we like, think is cool and maybe of interest to you our listeners.
 
“When the going gets weird, the weird turn professional.”
― Hunter S Thompson
 
00:02
this is a test of the emergency
00:03
broadcast system of high tech for sound
00:08
[Music]
00:15
you're listening to the pro audio suite
00:18
a program for audio and voice-over
00:20
professionals
00:22
[Music]
00:28
welcome to another pro audio suite -
00:31
Robert but we do have George
00:33
good afternoon evening and it's five
00:35
o'clock somewhere it is but not a yeah
00:38
it's repose up in Sydney we've got
00:41
Robert I'm back morning yeah I'm back
00:44
here and did you bring a note ID bring a
00:47
night I bring a note from a very
00:48
apologetic client it's a long story
00:51
shall I regard you later well we were
00:54
very concerned that you had been struck
00:57
down by a bus oh look it sounded well we
01:00
found out you hadn't we was so
01:01
disappointed it's look I am I've been
01:07
talking to a guy about a six-part TV
01:09
series for a while and then everything
01:12
went quiet as jobs do sometimes and so I
01:14
figured I was never gonna see it and
01:16
then two days before we were sporadic or
01:19
we were supposed to record I get a
01:20
frantic phone call from this guy going
01:22
um you know that series I was talking
01:24
about I had it mixed by some guy in New
01:26
Zealand and he sent all the mixers
01:28
across and we've compiled it all and
01:30
sent it off to the TV stations and it's
01:32
been rejected for audio recents and
01:34
video reasons
01:35
can you help um by the way this was and
01:40
this was on a Thursday by the way it
01:42
goes to air on Tuesday this was a half
01:50
hour or 45 minutes 46 minutes or
01:53
something yeah so long story short I was
01:54
basically sitting here redoing someone's
01:57
work who probably should never have done
01:59
the work in the first place because it
02:00
was the I only heard the mix for episode
02:03
1 and it was truly terrible and all that
02:07
place and certainly not compliant we
02:09
have all sorts of strange rules here in
02:10
Australia besides loudness you've got to
02:12
have 12 frames of silencing and 12
02:14
sounds of silence out and know what was
02:17
there and all sorts of stuff so yeah
02:18
that's yeah I think we're the only
02:20
country in the world that has that
02:21
George it's it's um it goes back to the
02:24
analog days when the the station's
02:26
decided they wanted some audio
02:28
separation between between shalls'
02:30
commercials yeah so they come up with
02:33
this rule that you had to have 12 frames
02:34
of silent scene and 12 frames of silence
02:36
out and now we've moved into the digital
02:39
world there
02:39
they never got rid of that he still must
02:41
have that if you don't have it it gets
02:42
rejected so um that was the only reason
02:46
they were all over the place and and the
02:47
video wasn't compliant either so someone
02:50
else had to do whatever they do to
02:51
rescue that so unsafe we got it to where
02:54
but um I wasn't answering phone calls or
02:57
answering emails or anything I was
02:59
ProTools the backside yeah that's right
03:02
yeah so um we've got it interesting with
03:04
the 12 front 12 frames thing that that
03:06
is a real trap for people in producing
03:08
spots outside of Australia for Australia
03:10
yeah yeah I think you said you twelve
03:13
frames out if my memory serves me
03:14
correctly is that rather on commercial
03:16
12 in 12 in and out no it's you know 12
03:19
annoyed that it is so I'm so effectively
03:22
because we were at 25 frames a second
03:24
effect effectively for a 30-second
03:26
commercial you get 29 seconds of audio
03:28
yeah and 30 seconds of picture and 30
03:31
seconds of picture that's right yes
03:33
Foxtel our pay TV network interestingly
03:37
the only requires six sixteen and six
03:41
hour so if yeah if it's going on Foxtel
03:44
only you can get away with six so if
03:47
you're doing a cut so you're doing a
03:48
commercial this is typical isn't it if
03:50
you're doing a commercial for Australian
03:52
TV and New Zealand TV and it was going
03:55
on Fox Fox tell ya that means they've
03:58
got to do three cuts they do one for 30
04:00
second for New Zealand 112 frames in 12
04:03
frames out for Australian live TV yeah
04:06
and then one six in six out for Foxtel
04:10
yeah yes technically yes it depends
04:13
sometimes they'll just do they'll just
04:15
live with the 12 in 12 out and
04:17
distribute that to everybody other type
04:20
of times they will do can you do us
04:21
three mixes yes just depends what I
04:25
learned so much today and I will never
04:28
need that ever again now you stole that
04:31
away in there you know for the next
04:32
trivia night you go to for the kids or
04:34
something yeah you know you know what's
04:37
gonna happen George someone will
04:39
actually one day bring that up and
04:41
they'll say is there any strange rules
04:43
in Australia cuz I'm just making
04:45
commercial for them yeah ah now
04:50
must tell you yeah actually yeah yeah
04:52
yeah that's right they're talking of
04:54
audio issues this is one that we have
04:57
and just to give our listeners an idea
04:59
of how this show works basically what we
05:02
do for this record while we were talking
05:04
to each other and monitoring each other
05:05
we use source connect now but what we
05:08
also do is record ourselves at our end
05:10
so Georgie record yours
05:12
Robert records his Robert records his
05:14
and I record mine call it a game
05:16
double-under exactly then we send
05:19
everything off to Robbo he then lays up
05:21
the four tracks and just gives it a bit
05:23
of a you know slide everything into
05:24
place then he sent it to me and because
05:26
I don't have multitrack I have Wavelab
05:29
which is running a stereo audio system I
05:31
only get the two tracks and is actually
05:33
a split mono feed really so I do the
05:36
Edit on that so I dual the you know deep
05:38
breathing and moving stuff around and
05:39
Counting great lungs out whatever has to
05:41
be done but we've had a couple of issues
05:43
in the last two well the last two I
05:45
think two shows that have been sent to
05:47
me from Rob oh there's a really strange
05:49
thing happening with the audio now my
05:51
audio is fine but everybody else is
05:53
audio it sounds like it's been deist and
05:56
compressed or something and I sent it
05:58
back to rubber and said what is yours if
06:01
you got the same problem and rubber you
06:03
didn't know I didn't it sounds like I
06:06
actually think it is happening on you
06:07
because I had another listen to it last
06:09
night when on you were gonna talk about
06:11
this today I actually think it is
06:12
happening on you but it's not quite as
06:14
noticeable but George to put you in the
06:16
picture to me what it sounds like
06:17
is someone running a de-esser but too
06:21
heavy so it's not just taking the tops
06:23
off the yeses it's taking the tops out
06:25
of everything you know so they're having
06:26
a nice it sounds like a yes is it s is a
06:32
disappearing completely in some places
06:34
yeah so fascinating yeah so it's we I
06:38
rang Andrew and went will you're a
06:40
dickhead because you're running a
06:41
de-esser and Andrew when I don't have a
06:43
DSL and I don't use any plugins
06:47
everything so so what I mean do you guys
06:51
know what I do on my own cuz you never
06:52
even asked what I'm doing on my hand
06:54
okay what are you doing you really want
06:58
to know offended if we can't see you do
07:01
we really want to know what you're doing
07:02
- yeah that's - an imaginary picture
07:07
draws a picture we're sitting
07:10
comfortably children yes okay well I am
07:13
mr. frugal when it comes to stuff and I
07:15
have using gear that is kind of
07:17
collected in my lap over the last 20
07:19
years most of it I didn't buy
07:21
it's just castaways and things I've
07:23
found from other studios along the way
07:25
but I'm using a mic processor between my
07:29
mic and the console and it's made by
07:32
roland it's called an mm p2 and it's
07:35
discontinued for quite a few years now
07:38
it's a stereo mic preamp with processing
07:41
digital processing so it's got expansion
07:44
and compression and EQ and all that kind
07:47
of fun stuff
07:47
and I'm using a decent amount of it I'm
07:51
I I cheat with an expander a lot because
07:54
I'm not in a great sounding studio and I
07:55
don't want anybody to know so yeah I
07:59
have an expander on there and and some
08:01
compression in the EQ is pretty close to
08:04
flat I'm sure I have a high-pass filter
08:06
on there too but I'm monitoring myself
08:11
through the processor so I certainly
08:13
hear what we'd be going to you and it
08:16
does definitely doesn't sound dest or
08:19
been washed in any way so should be okay
08:22
it's not why you're sending us it's
08:24
what's what it comes to me fine yeah and
08:27
then I I stick I lay everybody up in Pro
08:29
Tools yeah and then I bounced out a
08:31
stereo mix for Andrew that sounds fine
08:33
but so and then I deliver it to him via
08:36
hightail uh-huh he downloads is on he
08:39
there's his end and he's got this
08:41
lifeless everything sounds like
08:43
everything cut below about maybe eight
08:47
or nine K I'm sorry above I should say
08:49
everything above eight or nine K just
08:51
disappears and it sounds like this all
08:53
my tds has just been stacking everything
08:56
that's sounds impossible but III if we
09:00
don't know why it's happening I could
09:01
think of a possible theory as to how to
09:03
prevent it yeah without understanding
09:06
why it's happening
09:08
are you sending the files just as they
09:11
are like a wave with nothing later
09:13
they're not zipped into a zip file or
09:15
anything right
09:15
no they're just mixed down so I so
09:18
basically I clean up so if you've one of
09:20
us coughed behind someone else while
09:22
they're talking I'll cut all that out
09:23
yeah dude you're sending a wave file
09:26
right it's just sending a stereo mix
09:28
yeah so basically there's four tracks of
09:30
audio I mixed those down to a stereo
09:32
file and forward that onto a they yeah
09:33
because my hunch is that that file is
09:37
somehow being bastardized in the process
09:41
of being transferred I have no idea how
09:43
or why a great I'm thinking is that if
09:45
you zip it it's now basically encoded
09:49
not in CODIS but it's yeah what's the
09:52
word it's somehow projects rap don't you
09:55
yes and so maybe that will preserve the
10:00
quality it won't make the file much
10:02
smaller cuz waves don't zip down much
10:04
but maybe try that next time I'm gonna
10:07
do that that's a great idea
10:09
and then if Robert was here he would
10:11
certainly be talking about their utility
10:13
called sources zip what yes I don't know
10:15
if it has any utility for us moving from
10:18
stereo to mono stereo to multitrack and
10:22
black and black back and forth but my
10:25
understanding is sources if is designed
10:26
to do basically just that but a lot more
10:28
elaborate where it preserves the track
10:30
format and the you know the violin
10:33
namings you know just it makes it a
10:35
cleaner way to move projects between
10:37
studios you I wish he was here to
10:39
explain it better but maybe Robert might
10:41
um maybe Robert might donate a copy to
10:43
me for the show do you think I have no
10:48
choice that's his payment for not
10:56
turning up this week justice in a site
11:01
to that George I'm just having a look at
11:03
the MP 2 here on on Google that's
11:05
fascinating I've never seen one of those
11:06
before
11:07
yeah the MMP - yeah by rolling yeah
11:10
24-bit 96k yeah
11:13
what model like modeling preamp and it
11:15
has a mic modeling feature which Roland
11:17
was doing way back in you know kind of
11:19
the early days of that techno
11:21
and I don't use that feature to me Mike
11:24
modeling is which is a whole nother
11:27
topic we can go on if you like another
11:30
die think it's something I've been
11:31
thinking about lately because I watched
11:32
to see if it Steven slate interview
11:35
which creates the virtual microphone
11:38
systems but it has a mic modeler that I
11:41
don't use so I'm just using it because I
11:43
want to have an expander and a little
11:45
bit of compression on my mic so I can
11:47
get away with having my Mac Mini and
11:49
everything in just one room and you know
11:52
not have proper isolation yeah very well
11:56
so where'd you find that on in a garage
11:58
sale somewhere or something man you know
12:01
I just I just
12:01
I've I've spent time on websites like
12:04
gear slots of course over the years but
12:06
I've also googled tremendously like the
12:09
next cool thing to set up in a home
12:11
voice actors a studio you know what
12:13
channel strips and such and so forth and
12:16
this thing just popped up on the radar
12:17
I've had it for at least five or six
12:19
years so I can't remember where I saw it
12:22
but when I by the time I heard it it was
12:24
way out of production and no longer
12:27
considered really desirable so I think I
12:29
only paid probably $150 maybe less for
12:33
this thing so well um it's doing a
12:36
fantastic job for what it is yeah it's
12:38
fascinating I've got a question for you
12:40
George if you're on gear slots
12:42
Bogey's months what's your name
12:45
oh um you know what I have not been on
12:50
gear slots for quite some time
12:51
I would have to log in and actually look
12:53
and see what my name on there is but one
12:56
of my old user names that I came up with
13:00
when I was in college that I was still
13:02
used to this day on certain sites is um
13:05
when typing in now his sound gun so oh
13:10
if you ever see sound gun anywhere out
13:13
yep it just auto logged me in a sound
13:16
gun on gear so look at that
13:19
everybody now knows I gave it away sound
13:23
good because there's somebody because
13:24
I'm El Cid Els ID okay oh I know I
13:30
thought I've dropped a few things in
13:32
there which you been so
13:34
way off the mark anyway just my opinion
13:37
but there's a couple of people on there
13:39
I think is one called Fraser mm I don't
13:42
know what his real name is but there's a
13:44
couple of guys and they're obviously I
13:46
think phrases actually works in a store
13:49
or something and he's a techie dude I
13:51
think that's you know it's like he's a
13:52
dweeb right into gear selling gear and
13:54
fixing gear yeah but there's a couple of
13:56
other guys and I I read this stuff a
13:58
nice like I reckon they're really like a
14:00
high-end audio engineer like record
14:02
engineer you can just tell by the way
14:04
they talk and the things they talk about
14:05
and can tell that they're in like you
14:07
know sunset sound or you know somewhere
14:09
like that and they're really well-known
14:11
audio engineer like a chick irelia or a
14:14
bloody um you know those kind of guys
14:16
but I'd love to know who they are but
14:19
they hide behind these pseudonyms so
14:21
know who they are yeah exactly exactly
14:23
well yeah if you see anything sound gun
14:25
I don't know if there's anybody else out
14:27
there with the same name but I I think I
14:30
came up with it in college I wanted to
14:31
have a sound that was accurate and
14:33
powerful so a sound gun oh I just take
14:40
Rob oh and stick a couple of numbers
14:42
after it yeah that's right Robbo 62
14:46
Robbo 77 Robbo 428 it's funny what's
14:51
funny with nicknames isn't it I'm we're
14:53
getting off topic here but when I first
14:55
left full time radio and went freelance
14:57
I went from rock and roll radio at
15:00
Triple Aim where I'd been for 13 years
15:01
and I ended up working for the ABC which
15:04
is the government broadcaster here their
15:07
youth station called triple j which is a
15:09
National Youth Network and if it was my
15:13
first day there freelancing I was there
15:14
for a couple of weeks and on walking
15:16
down the corridor a couple of CDs in my
15:18
hand heading back to the studio to make
15:20
a promo and the program directors
15:22
standing at the other end of the
15:23
corridor going Darren Darren Darren
15:26
finally goes Rob oh yeah so used to Rob
15:33
I would was even zoned out to Darren
15:35
wasn't even thinking being at the ABC
15:39
they could have called you mr. Robertson
15:40
that's right exactly
15:42
yeah indeed yeah yeah that song that was
15:44
always a classic they're talking gear
15:45
slot so I did see something pop up and
15:47
gear slots nice
15:47
sent a link to you George and Robert
15:50
because once again the road thing is
15:52
intriguing me they've just launched a
15:55
few different microphones a few new ones
15:57
but the one that looks really
15:59
interesting for voice-over is the NT 49
16:03
mm-hmm
16:04
and I did see that mention on gear
16:06
as well couple of guys who said it is
16:08
anybody seen one yet or Nathan
16:10
Thomas 49 NT 49 yeah yeah mm-hmm
16:14
November tango November says the proper
16:17
yes the proper yeah phonetic alphabet
16:20
nice and sexy looking a little based
16:22
isn't it it's really because if you
16:25
remember they did the ribbon they the
16:27
NTR was the ribbon microphone they did
16:30
that was the first one with that kind of
16:31
shape and and now they've done the anti
16:34
50 which is an omni microphone comes in
16:37
pairs and that's for recording like
16:39
orchestras or that way you need an omni
16:41
mic and then off that they've done a
16:44
variable capsule for that body as a
16:47
condenser mic yeah which looks really
16:49
really interesting I wonder how much the
16:51
body effects the sound because that's a
16:53
big thing with norman like they've
16:54
they've patented the shape of the head
16:56
basket on the u67 for example when you
16:59
know and yeah yeah i find it intriguing
17:02
um and they've obviously done a lot of
17:05
research and development and i know the
17:06
guy that we interviewed Peter who's the
17:09
Belgian guy that joined them about a
17:11
year ago and he was involved in the the
17:13
I I won the little interface has also
17:16
been involved in the development of
17:17
these microphones so I'm really curious
17:19
what they're gonna sound like so I've
17:21
put in a call to Road just to see if
17:22
they'll let us borrow one just to check
17:24
it out but I haven't heard anything back
17:26
as yet but I shall keep you posted but
17:29
told you looks rolled out officially
17:30
right here on exactly but yeah I look
17:36
I'm I'm really interested in what
17:38
they're doing because they're they're
17:39
certainly taking on the big boys now oh
17:43
yeah no I haven't always been impressed
17:45
with Road I even had a I might have
17:47
mentioned this before I even had a
17:48
dealership at one time when I was
17:50
dabbling and selling equipment which I
17:52
won't do anymore
17:53
then they were so nice too to deal with
17:57
that just a guy you know who's just a
17:59
guy installing gear and they were happy
18:02
to set me up as a dealer and let me
18:05
resell their product and their
18:06
distributor I think they're US offices
18:08
were in Santa Barbara or something okay
18:11
not far away
18:12
and so I just they were really nice to
18:14
deal with rode great company yeah yeah
18:17
so there you go that's another knee mark
18:19
have you come across any anything in the
18:21
microphone area that said caught your
18:23
eye well I was just mentioning maybe
18:26
before we were on went on the air at
18:28
this whole these virtual mic systems and
18:31
there's a couple of them out there now
18:33
there's the VMS from slate digital and
18:36
then there's the Townsend labs speer p22
18:40
I think it is something 22 and they're
18:44
they're both designed around the idea
18:46
that you can take one microphone that's
18:48
a known quantity and then from that
18:50
microphone emulate any other microphone
18:53
and the slate system actually they sell
18:57
their own mic and their own preamp the
18:59
the main thing that you're really buying
19:00
though or buying into is the emulations
19:03
and it's totally done on native software
19:05
so I guess the advantage of it is that
19:08
you don't have to use their preamp and
19:10
you don't have to use any other extra
19:12
hardware you just have to have the mic
19:13
as long as you have an extremely flat
19:16
preamp it'll work with really any preamp
19:19
and then they emulate the microphone and
19:23
tests I've heard and the buzz and the
19:25
business and these guys have been out of
19:27
for a few years now is that it's it's
19:29
pretty legit it's the real deal but it
19:32
entirely relies on plugins so it's not a
19:35
hardware solution as much as it is a
19:38
software solution whereas the Townsend
19:41
labs system is a little bit more I don't
19:44
know
19:45
hardware related and the other thing
19:47
that makes the towns and labs might
19:48
quite different is that it has two
19:51
capsules and each capsule has its own
19:55
output so it kind of appears like a
19:58
stereo mic but whereas your typical
20:00
cardioid or switchable pattern mic you
20:03
know has two capsules but then the
20:06
the two capsules are blended together
20:08
and phased in and out to make it an omni
20:10
or a cardioid or a figure eight with the
20:13
spear system those two capsules are
20:15
completely in an independent completely
20:17
independently controllable within the
20:19
software so you can shape the pickup
20:22
pattern and do all kinds of wacky stuff
20:24
in the computer after you've recorded
20:26
something so you can basically steer the
20:29
pickup pattern where you want and on all
20:31
and any off any side of the microphone
20:33
and you can change the impedance of the
20:37
microphone all sorts of stuff from a
20:40
control panel so that's kind of a new
20:43
technology that bleeding edge of
20:45
microphone design I think right now is
20:47
that sort of technology and I haven't
20:50
demoed these in my own world where I've
20:52
gotten to play with them yet but it's
20:53
definitely on the radar hookup Townsend
20:56
labs Townsend T o WN Sen D lab dr. Diaz
21:01
and you'll find the sphere L 22 which
21:05
sells for $1,500 u.s. whereas its
21:09
competitor the slate digital Mike with
21:13
preamp and software is $1,000 so okay so
21:16
what are you saying is there 1500 yeah
21:18
this is more expensive but it's also
21:20
more sophisticated yeah but doesn't I
21:23
mean in terms of something anything that
21:25
seems entirely new to me those are some
21:28
of the entirely new ideas other than
21:31
that like trying to think what's like a
21:35
game should I mean I can't think of any
21:37
mic that's coming along and saying okay
21:39
everybody stop using the 41 six and go
21:42
get this like remember we've created our
21:49
own monster yes I haven't found the mic
21:53
that's truly dethroned it I mean I
21:55
always hearing about this micro that mic
21:57
that people tend to feel might favor but
22:00
it's amazing how often someone will have
22:02
that mic and something else and then
22:05
I'll ask them which one are you using
22:06
most of the time and they'll say the
22:08
forty one six and I don't know if it's
22:10
momentum laziness it just works
22:14
familiar familiarity it's obviously not
22:18
a bad mic
22:20
it's a it's a very good mic but it's not
22:24
a flat mic it has a sound it just
22:27
happens to be a sound that works well
22:29
for a lot of voices on a lot of kinds of
22:31
stuff that's right exactly
22:33
and it's it's true because I mean I've
22:35
got a TL m103 in the cupboard but I
22:39
rarely drag it out mm-hmm you know if
22:42
I've booked a voice talent which is rare
22:45
for me most of my voice recording I'll
22:47
dry hire a studio rather than do it here
22:51
in a in a project studio but I do I
22:55
rarely drag it out it's it's Erin
22:56
whenever I'm recording this sort of
22:57
stuff on my wife's recording voiceovers
22:59
the Sennheiser's the go-to yeah I mean
23:02
it's also more advantageous in a home
23:04
studio scenario whether maybe your noise
23:06
floor isn't the greatest to the 416 will
23:09
attract more background noise and have
23:11
some practical reasons to but the other
23:14
mic that's not that people are getting
23:17
interested in because they want an
23:19
ointment but maybe not want to spend
23:20
thousand-plus as the TL on one out - and
23:23
it's my I was just talking to a friend
23:26
of mine voice actor and fellow techie
23:29
head Graham Spicer and he said he's
23:31
finds himself using the t LM 102 now
23:34
more than anything and he likes it
23:37
because it has a more of a flat response
23:39
until you get to the top where it has a
23:41
big has a bump at the top whereas the
23:44
103 kind of has a rise in the upper
23:47
mid-range and has a little bit more of
23:49
that
23:49
u-87 mid-range bump that doesn't always
23:54
work for everybody it can be a little
23:56
nasal or a little honky sounding and
23:59
that one or two doesn't have that so
24:01
that's an interesting alternative if
24:03
you're looking for a different flavor
24:04
it's also a more affordable just look
24:06
that up
24:06
I'm 850 bucks us yeah that's the that's
24:10
the affordable Neyman no no and I've
24:14
heard of a lot of voice actors being
24:15
recommended that mic for their first
24:18
studio set up and nothing wrong with
24:20
that recommendation I just I guess cuz
24:22
I'm kind of a cheapskate I don't usually
24:24
recommend it $850 a mic for the first
24:26
voice actor studio I'm gonna stick mend
24:29
something 300 or less usually like the
24:32
NT one or
24:33
an 80 40 40 or something like that but
24:37
the 102 is a different take on their the
24:41
mic the anointment sound it's a it's a
24:43
different sounding mic than a lot of the
24:45
others yeah well one of the mics I use
24:47
and you'd probably look this one up as
24:48
well is a couple of micro tech refills
24:50
here and the first micro tech FL I
24:54
bought was the m9 30 right and if you
24:58
have a look at the patent on that on you
24:59
know because it's fixed
25:01
you know cardioid but have a look at the
25:03
have a look at the patent on that you'll
25:05
see what I mean it's pretty flat it's a
25:07
perfect beautifully made microphone so
25:09
they have a bunch of them do you know
25:11
what variation you have just the m9 30
25:14
but I did get the I did get the
25:16
limited-edition one when it came out
25:18
which was $2,000
25:20
know it which was the George Norman 80th
25:24
anniversary one you know what's really
25:26
awesome if you want to look at and
25:28
really geek out and compare microphones
25:30
are you familiar with a website called
25:31
recording hacks calm oh yeah yep yep he
25:35
makes design much he does it does make
25:37
several but what's cool is they have the
25:40
ability to look at a frequency response
25:41
and then overlay another microphones
25:44
response it's really cool so if you're
25:48
looking at I'm doing it right now if
25:49
you're looking at a mic like them 1 930
25:51
you'll see in the specifications area
25:54
the curve if you click on it it pops out
25:57
a window and then in that window there's
26:00
an empty box that says select another
26:01
mic and you just start typing the name
26:03
of the mic and it pops up and so I typed
26:05
in caddy 100's because this is one of my
26:08
favorite mics that it just sounds
26:11
surprisingly good
26:13
it's us-made for people that find that
26:15
intriguing and it's under 500 us and it
26:20
sounds fantastic very low noise and I
26:22
want to I wanted to line those two up so
26:24
because when you mention that you and I
26:27
saw the curve it said that looks like
26:28
the e100 s-curve and it's very similar
26:32
they just have their peaks at a little
26:34
bit different spot though 930 peak is up
26:37
higher it's above 10k which I kind of
26:40
liked actually and the the cads peak is
26:45
maybe at like 8 K
26:46
so but other than that they're really
26:48
similar very flat across the board
26:50
otherwise yeah I also like that that 930
26:53
is so small which actually the 102 is
26:56
also a very compact mic you might not
26:58
notice it without context but the 102 is
27:02
maybe almost half the size of a 103
27:04
physically so it's the one two nine
27:07
thirty and then one or two are very
27:09
similar in shape which is kind of nice
27:11
for voiceover because it doesn't
27:13
obstruct your copy as easily are the
27:16
inline 30 is great and also was that mic
27:18
I used to take on the road with me
27:20
because if I'm using like the Porter
27:23
booth it's perfect
27:24
cuz it's small it just sits in there you
27:26
know it doesn't get in the way at all I
27:27
have to remember that one I I've heard
27:29
that one come up a voice actor here in
27:31
the US who does a lot of blogging named
27:33
Paul Strickler de is a really big fan of
27:36
that microphone well you know the funny
27:38
thing is about Paul years and years and
27:40
years ago I did a thing I think it could
27:42
have been on Kia slots or somewhere and
27:44
I mentioned that that the chain I used
27:47
was an m9 30 and a grace m101 and that
27:52
was from advice from a guy here in
27:53
Melbourne mm-hmm and I put that up there
27:55
and he ended up because when I spoke to
27:59
him about the the microphone said IB he
28:01
actually in one one and oh yes yeah and
28:05
but he went and bought the m101 he said
28:08
Oh and I said what made you buy the mono
28:10
one he said I read it somewhere that you
28:12
know that microphone in that preamp
28:14
worked really well together and they're
28:15
fantastic and I said yeah that one sir
28:21
yes but it's you said that is a really
28:25
really nice chain to have the M 930 in a
28:29
my nose it's beautiful
28:31
I mean we do have a special guest
28:34
actually live on the line disfranchise
28:37
it is we've got expat Ozzy who now lives
28:43
in Hollywood and he's working in film
28:45
and television doing audio yeah an old
28:47
radio buddy of mine and yours indeed
28:49
indeed it's David Raines so uh so Dave
28:52
wanted to to get us started why don't
28:54
you give us an idea of your average day
28:56
at work then at the moment what are you
28:57
doing what are you
28:58
you working with what are you doing what
28:59
are you working on oh it varies quite a
29:02
lot I have a couple of different roles
29:05
here primarily I used to get hired a lot
29:09
as a recording mixer and now I get hired
29:11
to both mix and supervise re-recording
29:16
is what they call when you're when
29:18
you're you know mixing a television show
29:20
or a feature film so in that role I get
29:22
hired by either by the major studios or
29:25
by a certain production and you know I
29:29
come into the facility and work with the
29:31
crew and help steer the the mix and
29:34
obviously do the mixing as well get
29:37
hired as the sound supervisor which is
29:39
usually someone who's involved much
29:41
earlier in the show or in the movie and
29:45
you come in and you work with the
29:46
picture editor and the director and
29:48
composers and sometimes the
29:50
screenwriters you know budget the sound
29:53
high the crew often I choose the
29:55
facilities to be used in collaboration
29:58
with the filmmakers and then sort of act
30:00
acute the direction of the soundtrack
30:02
and then as part of that sometimes I'll
30:04
do the mixing as well so does that
30:06
happen
30:07
before production even begins sometimes
30:10
it does it's it's great when it does
30:12
it's rare I have a few filmmakers that
30:17
insist on me being involved while their
30:19
screenwriting and definitely in the
30:22
pre-production a lot of studio
30:26
productions don't just not set up that
30:29
way it really takes the filmmakers
30:32
pushing that direction for it to happen
30:34
that's fascinating because I just have a
30:36
very small stint in production mixing I
30:39
never got to the Union level but I had a
30:41
taste of that for a few years so it's
30:43
interesting the interesting to hear how
30:45
what you do fits into the timeline of
30:48
the sound post on the film yes and I
30:51
would say that I've done about a day or
30:54
maybe two days of actual production
30:56
mixing as I I don't I don't profess to
31:02
have the skills to be a production mixer
31:03
and but what I have done is been you
31:07
know I work on one series up here that
31:08
was shot up in Canon
31:09
and I worked with that production crew
31:12
producers and everyone else but also
31:15
that sound production crew for about
31:17
five years straight and I used to fly
31:20
myself up to Canada on my own dime every
31:23
year before we went into post but while
31:25
I was shooting to just go on the set and
31:28
see what those guys were doing because
31:30
they were amazing Wow
31:32
and they're all good friends of mine but
31:34
like I said I don't profess to be and be
31:37
the guy who can do that
31:38
when I'm involved in you know product
31:41
pre-production and you know prior to
31:43
film shooting
31:44
it's from a the perspective of how are
31:47
we going to make this film feel
31:50
emotionally what subjects are we going
31:53
to bring to it from a sound perspective
31:55
what can sound bring to the screenplay
31:57
and to the perspective of the shooting
32:00
that will mean that it is a more or less
32:03
emotional journey for the audience
32:05
depending on what the filmmaker wants so
32:07
for your your day or the average day
32:10
working on a film what does that entail
32:13
I mean because for a lot of people who
32:15
are listening and probably thought
32:16
you're on the faders doing a mix but
32:18
obviously we just worked out you not so
32:19
what do you actually do I do do that
32:22
absolutely and when I'm on a mixed stage
32:25
and I'm mixing it's the standard mixed
32:26
day having today the standard mixed day
32:28
here is here's a minimum of nine hours
32:31
at the console or running the room and
32:36
that process of mixing is broken into
32:41
sort of parts you know the dialogue pre
32:43
dubs the effects products
32:45
music production cetera and then what we
32:48
call the final which is bringing all
32:51
those elements together and working out
32:52
what the final print is going to sound
32:54
like so yes I will do that but more
32:57
lately is this only the last couple of
33:00
years I've been doing a lot more
33:01
supervising such a standard day it can
33:05
vary tremendously I could be out
33:08
recording animals or vehicles or weapons
33:13
or any you know key story element that
33:18
needs a library built for the production
33:21
I could be
33:23
you know editing dialogue I could be
33:25
editing staff and you know sound effects
33:26
mostly I have a crew who does that stuff
33:30
but as a supervisor arms are killed in
33:33
all those areas so I will usually get my
33:36
feet wet in all those areas to a greater
33:39
or lesser degree working a lot with
33:43
actors is often something I do for
33:47
instance I just did an action picture
33:49
for an Indonesian director last year
33:51
which we finished down at Paramount and
33:53
I spent two weeks in Jakarta shooting
33:56
ADR ADR for those of you that don't know
33:59
is dialogue replacement
34:01
so getting the principal actors to maybe
34:05
reread lines to add to them to clarify
34:08
story or in the case of this film was a
34:12
big action film and there were groups of
34:14
people running around the jungle trying
34:15
to kill themselves or kill each other
34:17
rather it was about creating tension in
34:20
the track in terms of hearing the other
34:23
people moving around you know the jungle
34:26
gosh I can imagine the challenge of
34:28
getting any kind of usable dialogue in
34:31
that kind of environment I mean I'm sure
34:33
they're better at it now than they ever
34:34
have been in the past but it still got
34:36
to be very difficult actually that
34:39
production in particular had really good
34:41
production sound some of the things that
34:44
production mixes do I don't know how
34:46
they do it but but what they do and the
34:49
tracks that they're able to bring into
34:51
post are unbelievable but what it
34:56
usually takes for that to happen is for
35:00
the production to treat you know to give
35:02
them some authority on the set and to
35:04
sort of back them up because if you look
35:08
at a decent sized film production there
35:10
might be a hundred people on the set of
35:12
which only you know four or five of them
35:14
might be cast and there's on even on a
35:18
big film there's only three sound people
35:21
on today so there's there's 90 odd other
35:25
people that are really just related to
35:27
the camera department and everything
35:29
associated with the picture so you know
35:32
wardrobe production production design
35:34
everything else so
35:36
all those people are focused on what you
35:37
see and there's only really three people
35:39
on the set focused on what you hear and
35:41
so just the physics of the environment
35:44
the physics of the number of people on
35:45
set make it very difficult for a
35:47
production sound crew to get good sound
35:49
unless they have an entire production
35:53
from the producers on down that respects
35:55
their role if they don't then the track
35:57
won't be any good it's interesting I've
35:59
seen you because when you look at a
36:01
soundstage or or actually a film set
36:04
they're not designed particularly well
36:06
for audio so there must be a huge
36:09
challenge if you're the audio person on
36:11
set yeah my perspective you know it was
36:16
ridiculous at times the and I was again
36:18
I was working at the low end of the
36:20
spectrum budget wise
36:22
but generally I understand it's probably
36:24
not that different going up the food
36:25
chain
36:26
you know you're you're just like he said
36:29
I mean I always felt like we were the
36:30
redheaded stepchild of the production
36:33
you know if we were lucky we had to
36:35
sound people on set at that budget and
36:38
they was getting it was very difficult
36:40
to get your - to get them to even give
36:43
you room tone at times you know let
36:46
alone anything else so yeah it was very
36:49
challenging to get usable sound yeah
36:51
it's very like I said it all comes from
36:53
the top and it all comes from you know
36:56
the great production crew I worked with
36:57
up in Canada they did a pilot that they
36:59
were shooting mostly in Calgary but and
37:02
they were based in Calgary which is in
37:04
the middle of Canada but they went out
37:07
and shot a pilot on the west coast in
37:09
Vancouver and I ended up mixing that
37:11
pilot and those tracks were just as bad
37:13
as all the other tracks I've received in
37:14
television and that told me oh you know
37:17
what it's not the production crew these
37:19
are the producers they didn't give them
37:21
authority they didn't back him up on the
37:23
set they didn't give them you know an
37:25
environment that promotes the ability to
37:28
record good sound and so therefore the
37:30
founders many could yeah we I mean we
37:33
use digital cameras back in that early
37:35
2000s it sounded like a refrigerator
37:37
when do you decide it's time in your in
37:41
your role to go out and get elements go
37:43
do field recording and and because
37:46
obviously you must have some
37:48
massive sound libraries to draw from
37:51
it's a collaborative decision and you
37:55
know because there always involves
37:56
spending money so you know you've got to
37:58
get the production to pay for it right
38:00
and you know like in every you know film
38:05
is a one of the guys you wanna brothers
38:07
said to me years ago he said you know
38:09
it's a handmade product from start to
38:11
finish
38:11
film in general but sound also and so
38:15
you look at every single piece of in the
38:19
case of sound every piece of sound that
38:21
goes into a track and if it is not
38:23
handmade the right way for an emotional
38:26
response that is the right promotional
38:28
response you're looking for in that
38:30
scene or that moment or that emotional
38:32
beat then it's not the right sound you
38:35
know you can have I've used really sort
38:38
of old you know I've used sound ideas
38:41
series/1000 sound effects in big movies
38:43
not because they're terribly great even
38:46
recordings as it relates to these days
38:49
recordings but they're the right sound
38:51
for that emotion so in terms of making
38:55
your decision about whether I go and
38:57
shoot something it comes down to do we
38:59
have the right sounds for the emotion
39:01
we're looking for in this in this moment
39:03
and if we don't then we generally go and
39:07
try and record it
39:08
my sound library at home but you know my
39:11
personal library which I've been
39:12
building for nearly two decades now it's
39:16
pretty large but it's not it's only
39:18
about the quarter of the size of the
39:20
major studios sound library and even
39:24
then with a major studio behind me I
39:28
often will make the decision or try and
39:31
get the production to get us involved in
39:34
recording you know something new for
39:36
instance I did a documentary I was at
39:39
Universal at the time and you know
39:41
they've got a pretty big library it's
39:43
it's I don't know six seven hundred
39:45
thousand sounds I guess and this
39:48
documentary was about elephants and it
39:50
was about the fact that elephants are
39:52
going to be extinct in the wild in
39:54
Africa body into this decade unless
39:56
something changes and so the filmmaker
40:00
was very empathetic towards elephant
40:02
spent several years in Africa shoe you
40:04
know recording the film shooting the
40:06
film but of course in the process of
40:09
acquiring the footage they used for the
40:11
film when you shoot documentary style
40:14
it's generally pretty rough in terms of
40:16
soundtrack and so we had these beautiful
40:18
emotional shots of elephants but the
40:21
sound wasn't anywhere near intimate
40:24
enough for those moments and so I
40:26
convinced the picture editor to convince
40:28
the director to give us some budget to
40:31
go on record elephants and I wrangled I
40:33
had five African elephants for about a
40:36
day at a sanctuary up near Monterrey on
40:39
the California coast and we recorded
40:42
these elephants and then of course
40:43
brought them back in you know cleaned
40:45
all the recordings up put them in our
40:47
library and then started editing and
40:48
editing the men into the picture and the
40:51
weird thing about it was even though the
40:54
filmmaker had made the decision to give
40:55
us a budget to go and do it she didn't
40:57
really understand what it was going to
40:59
do to fit film and that became obvious
41:02
to me when we came down to Los Angeles
41:04
because they were cutting up in Oregon
41:07
she came down to LA and we press play on
41:09
the first reel to run the the track with
41:12
her and give her an idea of how it was
41:14
coming together and she pretty much
41:17
cried through the whole reel Wow
41:20
and and it was about her emotional
41:23
response to hearing the intimacy of
41:25
these elephants and and what elephants
41:27
do when they are being very passive and
41:30
very very human actually
41:33
and it you know it's mostly the
41:36
rumblings not the trumpeting sound but
41:37
the rumblings and the swishing of the
41:39
trunk and those kind of sounds settle
41:41
it's kind of forgotten what those sounds
41:42
were like and what they would would do
41:44
for an audience and obviously what they
41:46
did for her that's fantastic wow that's
41:49
nice but it was it was very much a
41:51
collaborative decision but getting back
41:54
to your original question the first
41:55
thing we do is try and use them you know
41:57
the material we have it's funny though
42:04
isn't I mean I actually came across
42:06
something not on the scale of what
42:08
you're talking about but I was actually
42:09
doing a comedy sketch for a radio
42:11
station I do some work for up in
42:13
Singapore and there was
42:15
of seen in inverted commas in this radio
42:17
sketch where someone walked into the
42:19
room and I couldn't find a door I know
42:23
it sounds stupid but I couldn't find a
42:24
door opening and closing that sort of
42:26
seemed to make it work and I remembered
42:29
jeez we were talking about our radio
42:31
days before the interview but about 20
42:33
odd years ago my old boss in Brisbane
42:34
had this door that he used to use for
42:36
the breakfast show and one of the
42:38
characters would sort of inadvertent
42:39
commas enter and leave the studio we
42:42
used to call it but we still call it the
42:43
comedy door because it just it's perfect
42:46
and actually ended up ringing him and
42:47
getting him to sent it to me because
42:49
purely because I couldn't find anything
42:51
else that was right and and and that's
42:53
the magic of it isn't it is finding that
42:55
sound that is just absolutely spot-on
42:58
perfect in each and every way for for
43:01
that scene right I was gonna say I heard
43:04
a great story the other day about the
43:05
movie Red October and there's a scene in
43:08
the movie where the the submarines sunk
43:10
and it's kind of like a fan kind of
43:12
noise and just watch just that eerie
43:14
kind of the silence yeah the silent yeah
43:17
that's it and every time the sound guys
43:20
put the sound in the director would come
43:21
down and say no no and it went on and on
43:24
and on and it got to the point where the
43:27
guy who was doing the sound and went up
43:29
and sat on the roof and had a ciggy
43:30
while he was up there he heard the fans
43:33
on the rooftop air conditioning went
43:35
downstairs grabbed his recorder recorded
43:38
the fans on the air-conditioning unit on
43:40
the roof came back processed it threw it
43:42
back in as the directors leaving he said
43:44
can't come and check this out before you
43:46
go bang that was it that was the sound
43:48
they ended up using in the movie you
43:50
know it's also interesting about that
43:51
movie and I only know this because I
43:54
know the sound supervisor she's a very
43:56
very good friend of mine and I was very
43:59
lucky to meet her almost before I moved
44:02
to Los Angeles and around the time of
44:06
when I moved to Los Angeles was the 20th
44:08
anniversary it was like four or five
44:10
years after I moved here it was the 20th
44:12
anniversary of that film and the studio
44:16
which is paramount and the Academy the
44:19
Motion Picture Academy put on a
44:21
screening was only one screening of the
44:23
print and they restored the print and
44:25
they played it at the academy theater
44:27
here in Los Angeles and
44:28
when they were talking afterwards the
44:31
production sound mixer was there and he
44:33
told a story about how they gathered the
44:36
production sound on that film because
44:38
they did win an Oscar for this out and
44:41
someone said well how did you get the
44:43
you know such a good production sound
44:44
and his options were boom or plant mics
44:50
on most of the production he couldn't
44:52
use a boom because all the sets were
44:55
built it at the studio and they were all
44:57
submarine sets so they were all really
44:59
really short and you know small right so
45:03
he couldn't get a mic in over the top
45:04
and he could barely get a mic in under
45:05
the bottom so he ended up putting client
45:08
Mike's all the way through all the sets
45:10
and he would mix the track with these
45:13
plant mics well and he asked everyone in
45:16
the audience he said you know given the
45:18
perspective of wearing you know twenty
45:21
eleven right now whatever it was how
45:24
many tracks do you think came off that
45:26
set and the answer is one track of sound
45:30
yeah well so he nixed he mixed it live
45:34
to Nagre one track and they want an
45:37
Academy Award Wow isn't it so
45:39
mind-boggling I mean he has to had a
45:41
board there on you know and his cart and
45:43
just it was like orchestrating Lee
45:46
moving the faders as the actors moved
45:48
through the sadden he would have to know
45:53
the scripts better than any actor on the
45:54
set
45:55
yeah didn't know the script mr. blonde
46:01
they're probably not going to do seven
46:04
or eight takes until you get the mix
46:05
right yeah I'm guessing in production
46:16
really gets the opportunity for another
46:20
the camera yeah no you do if you don't
46:23
if you do you're in trouble put a shadow
46:27
in the frame it's like
46:30
it's the coldest shoulder on the planet
46:33
is that it's a tough feeling I can't
46:34
imagine I can't imagine uttering the
46:36
words I forgot to press record what
46:44
you're saying about yeah you're gonna
46:47
get the cold shoulder but you're gonna
46:48
get the cold shoulder from a hundred
46:49
people and there's only two or three of
46:51
you yeah that's right yeah that's right
46:54
but when they want to roll a duct tape
46:56
you got it on your card baby they love
46:58
you all of a sudden you gonna get the
47:02
cold shoulder from Sean Connery
47:06
individual yeah I can't imagine it'd
47:08
take too much well you know he's
47:11
licensed to kill after all Ryan the
47:13
disease he's not licensed to do a
47:15
Russian accent that's for sure I have a
47:19
I have a total geeky question insider
47:22
question I don't know how my inside of
47:24
this is but how often do you get to use
47:26
or how often do you choose to use the
47:29
Wilhelm scream explain if I listen as
47:39
though renze go I don't know when it was
47:42
first used but it looks 50s over 16 yeah
47:50
I guess in a diet was it was
47:53
blood-curdling these days it just comes
47:55
sounds kind of silly but been overused
47:58
I don't you I haven't actually used it
48:01
although I've worked on I've been at the
48:03
mix console when other supervisors have
48:05
brought it to the stage and put it up in
48:07
the tracks and we all have a chuckle
48:10
about it of course right I don't make it
48:13
part of my bag of tricks and the other
48:17
one that's I don't know the name of it
48:20
but there is a passing semi truck horn
48:23
sound the Doppler Hall yes that thing
48:28
Oh God hundreds of times I think yeah
48:33
and every time you go to a watch
48:39
yeah and every time a bad guy advances
48:44
on a protagonist in a film you know you
48:46
hear a gun I love it when the same
48:54
one who's doing the sound has no idea
48:56
about cars and you'll have a car in shot
48:59
and the sound you know if you know that
49:01
car is not the sound of that car yeah if
49:05
the car really sounds like in the sound
49:08
of pictures like more ballsy could even
49:17
go back to your story about the Hunt for
49:19
Red October though 2ap and sort of say
49:21
well hang on it's the submarines going
49:23
into a silent drive why do we need a
49:26
sound but you know again that's
49:28
Hollywood you've got to have something
49:29
there I'd say the one thing I don't know
49:31
work then this would be interesting cuz
49:32
David wanted to ask you this David
49:34
because I'm sure you've seen the movie
49:35
but this movie has very little dialogue
49:38
but the sound to me was amazing
49:41
have you seen Dunkirk oh and woody were
49:44
had here eyes out oh my god it was mixed
49:47
about 500 feet from where I'm sitting
49:49
right now Oh are they and yeah what were
49:55
you gonna ask me about it or yeah yeah
49:58
yeah how do you how do you write it
50:00
um it's a certain type of track and in
50:04
that filmmaker has been going down that
50:06
route for a number of years I'm not sure
50:11
that it's my taste in soundtrack but
50:14
having said that I can absolutely
50:16
appreciate the skill that it takes to
50:19
get a track like that I mean they're an
50:21
amazing crew Richard King is amazing and
50:24
Kerry Rizzo and the guys who makes those
50:26
tracks they're amazed I mean they're
50:28
just amazing and to be able to put a
50:30
track together like that I mean Chris
50:33
Nolan is a very very powerful force you
50:36
know and and you have to be to be a
50:38
director like that and to be at that
50:40
sort of playing at that level so you
50:43
know a lot of it comes to be able to
50:45
create a track like that you need a
50:47
filmmaker like Chris Nolan or a Michael
50:50
Mann because it is an unusual track
50:53
yeah and and there are people who in the
50:57
studio world may give you some
50:59
resistance about how to how to you know
51:02
about whether you can print that track
51:04
and it takes a filmmaker like a
51:06
crystalline or a Michael Mann someone
51:09
like that to say no this is the way this
51:11
is the direction we're going and this
51:12
hope you know so more power to them to
51:15
be able to create a track like that's
51:17
extraordinary track yeah and the
51:19
handsomer I mean he did the music from
51:21
memory and I just found the whole thing
51:23
did for the blue suspenseful and a
51:25
handsome is soundtrack or with music was
51:27
amazing Hollywood legend for about three
51:34
decades now indeed yeah speaking of
51:37
soundtracks do you ever find yourself
51:38
having an occasion to go over to the
51:42
Eastwood scoring stage it's in the next
51:46
building over where I'm sitting right
51:48
now I pass that every day I've been in
51:51
there a couple of times it's not my
51:53
domain it's not somewhere I get to play
51:57
around in it's one of the things though
51:59
that I loved that one of others has a
52:02
scoring stage and continues to maintain
52:04
it because and and continues to you know
52:08
pay for it and you know make it
52:10
available to filmmakers because scoring
52:13
stages have disappeared from LA
52:17
you know the tide Vittorio scoring stage
52:19
in in Studio City you know that was John
52:23
Williams favorite I heard for a long
52:25
time and they call that room down not
52:28
ten years ago and you know Fox and still
52:32
got a stage Sony's got one obviously you
52:35
know and Warner Brothers does Universal
52:37
doesn't have a scoring stage anymore
52:39
paramount doesn't have a scoring stage
52:41
anymore they took theirs down about 12
52:43
years ago so it's you ask about that
52:47
stage it's just great that they have won
52:48
here and that they continue to have it I
52:51
only mentioned it selfishly because I've
52:54
been very fortunate enough to see it and
52:56
sit in the room in the scoring room
52:58
during the recording of something one
53:01
time
53:02
and it was unbelievable I mean just from
53:06
a studio design perspective the noise
53:08
floor it's so quiet the moment the
53:11
conductor lifts the baton and he does
53:13
the downbeat it's absolutely dead silent
53:17
and there's a hundred people sitting in
53:19
there it's just incredible just an
53:21
amazing experience well you're one up on
53:23
me I've never I've never been in there
53:25
one has been musicians playing that
53:28
must've been amazing that was very lucky
53:30
I was I happen to be with Don LaFontaine
53:31
who somehow got a piece of music
53:35
recorded there so his wife Nita could
53:39
sing this piece with the orchestra
53:41
because I guess Don could do that kind
53:43
of thing and it was it was remarkable it
53:47
was really remarkable is so lucky to be
53:48
there don't can do whatever he wants I
53:50
would have thought yeah hey Yankee I
53:53
just want to go back on something you
53:54
said a second ago that I'm interested to
53:55
to sort of follow up the you were
53:58
talking about how I'm directors seemed
54:00
or directors have a signature sound not
54:03
just for one movie but sort of a
54:05
direction an audio direction they follow
54:07
in in a bunch of movies is that what you
54:09
were saying well it's not a signature
54:12
sound so much it's just a style of
54:13
filmmaking and I started derivative of
54:17
that is the style of the soundtrack
54:19
although in Nolan's case and some you
54:23
know great filmmakers their sound
54:24
impacts their film and their picture and
54:27
their everything else as much as those
54:29
things impact sound but he you know if
54:33
you'd listened to the last sort of six
54:35
films that he's done really after the
54:38
second Batman picture he did there's
54:41
been a definite sort of this is the
54:43
direction I'm going with my sound and
54:45
the integration of those two things and
54:48
the balance of those two you know sound
54:51
effects music and dialogue the balance
54:53
of those things he's definitely chosen a
54:55
path with that which you know some
54:57
people here and around the world I'm
55:00
sure have have sort of not agreed with
55:02
it but it's just the way he chooses to
55:06
make his films and in the case of
55:07
Dunkirk in particular I think it was it
55:11
was just animate to go you know
55:15
so what sort of things might that entail
55:17
is that a certain way that you treat
55:20
sound effect or you treat dialogue or or
55:22
you know in a bit finer detail without
55:25
getting too technical what sort of
55:26
things would would he be looking at um
55:28
there's certain things that he's done
55:32
which you know Hollywood has a there's a
55:35
star here which is in it you know it
55:38
starts from the script and so you're
55:40
your number one thing when you're
55:42
working on a film for the most part
55:45
you're always gonna want to hear the
55:47
dialogue and at a filmmakers risk
55:50
well they ignore that rule or at a
55:53
filmmaker you know they're going to have
55:54
they're going to get some pushback from
55:55
someone if if someone in the process of
55:59
finishing the film says I can't hear
56:01
those lines and he has got got close to
56:05
the threshold of acceptance and possibly
56:08
over that threshold do you guys remember
56:11
there was a character in one of the
56:12
Batman films called Bane made by care
56:15
buying a play by character named Tom
56:17
Hardy the echoes man Tom Hardy do you
56:20
guys remember that yeah yes definitely
56:22
sorry that name popped in the head when
56:24
you mention that beam yeah right he has
56:27
a mask on his head and his dialogue was
56:29
was quite difficult to hear in some of
56:32
the mixing and the pre dubs I remember
56:34
there was some back-and-forth and I
56:37
wasn't at Warner Brothers at the time
56:38
but I remember hearing about it in the
56:40
community that there was Connor and they
56:42
might have it being press about it you
56:44
know back and forth between the studio
56:45
and the filmmakers about well we can't
56:47
hear him we want to hear him do we avoid
56:49
him do we you know get him in that you
56:52
know if he men to do some more how do we
56:54
change that do we use the production
56:56
track do we not you know there's a lot
56:58
of back and forth about that and he was
57:01
he wanted to push the boundaries of that
57:03
and and push that sort of Hollywood
57:06
style of you know what you don't have to
57:08
hear every line so that's one of the
57:10
things that he has chosen to do and he
57:13
does that you know he did that with the
57:14
at least I heard he did it with
57:17
interstellar there was some once again
57:19
some press and some stuff in the in the
57:22
film community here in LA about how the
57:25
music might be too loud in interstellar
57:27
and people sort of saying
57:29
it was and some people saying it wasn't
57:31
and all that sort of thing
57:32
that's just derivative again if him
57:35
wanting to push those boundaries and say
57:36
I'm going in a different direction this
57:38
is this is not I'm not gonna make that
57:41
so I'm gonna make this film this is the
57:43
choice I choose to make it's funny thank
57:45
you for encapsulating that really helps
57:47
to understand that I was gonna say
57:48
though that was my takeaway from
57:49
interstellar was I actually came out of
57:51
a theater joint that music was loud I
57:55
want to know what you you've worked on I
57:58
mean the elephant story is fantastic so
58:00
it's clearly something that you're proud
58:02
of but what's another great example of
58:04
something you've had a lot of your
58:05
fingers all over that we should check
58:08
out I don't know that depends on what
58:14
sort of songs you you want you can look
58:15
at my IMDB make it easy for you mate
58:19
I've got one of your old promos on a DAT
58:21
here at the back of the studio you want
58:23
have y'all triple in promos I'll just
58:24
drag that out we'll play anymore storage
58:34
somewhere I'm in the same boat I got a
58:36
whole I got a whole bunch of debt
58:37
sitting in the back of the room that I
58:38
haven't touched in probably 15 years so
58:41
be interesting to see if they go in the
58:42
debt player or not I've heard the dads
58:44
don't last that long actually I probably
58:47
don't yeah yeah well yes microwaving
58:51
well that's all we used to do with the
58:53
reel-to-reel
58:54
absolutely seconds one run
58:57
that's it dub yeah get it or lose like
59:00
there's a couple films that I've worked
59:02
on that you know I mean I've worked on a
59:04
lot of like the elephant film the
59:05
documentary I don't think they've been
59:07
released worldwide it's certainly played
59:10
you know the president he President
59:12
Obama saw it and made some changes I
59:15
think based on that and a lot of other
59:17
input he was getting at the time to
59:19
import of illegal ivory into this
59:22
country you know that documentaries
59:25
played for a lot of world leaders and at
59:28
the UN and various other places because
59:30
the filmmakers a journalist and she
59:32
really she made the film to affect
59:34
change she didn't make the film to make
59:36
you know to have a big audience so I'm
59:40
proud of that film because of what it
59:43
means and
59:43
I'm also proud of it because of the
59:45
collaboration and the fact that from an
59:47
experience I got to go and you know work
59:50
with five African elephants for a day
59:52
and walk under them and record them an
59:56
incredible experience I've worked on
59:59
some films that would have been released
60:01
in Australia that I think are really
60:04
good tracks but I wasn't necessarily the
60:06
lead sound guy on them I worked on a
60:09
film called unbroken which was actually
60:12
filmed in Australia and there to really
60:16
receive Lina yeah yeah I can't say I've
60:19
but George is saying he has yeah Wow I
60:22
liked it a lot because it was only made
60:26
a couple of years ago and it was made
60:28
for a reasonable-sized studio budget but
60:32
it's not a film about men in tights and
60:36
I was just thankful to be on a
60:39
production that was to me the sort of
60:42
epitome of a big Hollywood blockbuster
60:45
without being about superheroes you know
60:49
kind of a classic canvas for a large
60:51
picture and I think the sound on that
60:55
film is great not because I was involved
60:57
I was only a small part of it but um but
61:00
it's a great track because the director
61:02
shows and the picture editors and
61:04
everyone else they chose not to have a
61:06
lot of score in the film which to me
61:09
opens it up a lot more for opportunities
61:11
to sound to help tell the story and it's
61:14
also the sort of story where you
61:15
wouldn't want a lot of score so it's a
61:18
really great sound picture I know I
61:21
worked on a picture called Patriots Day
61:23
a couple of about 18 months ago which is
61:26
about the Boston Marathon bombing here
61:27
in in the States
61:29
it's it's got like it's got a really
61:32
good cast and it's a really great i-ight
61:36
when you often when you work on a film
61:38
particularly a bigger production as a
61:40
sound person you don't get to see it in
61:42
its entirety if you're part of the
61:44
editorial and editorial crew it's just
61:47
the way it comes together and also with
61:50
a picture like that with that filmmaker
61:53
you know you guys are probably a little
61:55
more used to a linear
61:57
action workflow in other words you have
62:00
a script and you have everything kind of
62:02
like Robbo when you're doing an advert
62:04
of a TV advertisement they generally
62:06
give you a lock cut right yeah that's it
62:08
right well that doesn't happen in
62:10
filmmaking anymore yeah on that on
62:14
Patriot's Day we had 11 reels of film so
62:17
eleven two thousand four hundred and
62:20
forty minutes of film and we were
62:23
getting two new cuts on each reel every
62:27
day for months
62:28
well Wow and we were already in pre dubs
62:32
and finals so we were conforming twice a
62:35
day to every real upwards of three four
62:39
thousand tracks of sound every day all
62:42
day long so when you're in that
62:45
environment you don't often get to see
62:47
the picture you know play out
62:50
and so that film I was surprised at how
62:53
much I enjoyed watching it you know six
62:55
or eight months after it was released I
62:57
sat down no I watched it and I was like
63:00
oh actually is it actually really good -
63:02
yeah yeah do you think that's happening
63:05
because technology allows that to happen
63:08
and so since the technology allows it to
63:11
happen they're more prone to do it
63:12
that's absolutely one of the factors
63:14
yeah people you know produce you know
63:17
producers studio executives you know
63:20
anyone who's in part of the
63:21
decision-making process they know that
63:23
we have all these great tools and we can
63:25
do you know really amazing things with
63:28
them and the fact that you you can only
63:32
cut a 35 mil print once you know and no
63:35
one's working in 35 mil anymore so these
63:38
days you can make as many cuts as you
63:39
want and you can just keep cutting you
63:42
know and yeah and there's absolutely for
63:46
filmmakers that make the choices and
63:48
executives no one else to make the
63:50
choice to not make decisions that is an
63:53
option that they can now do you know
63:56
yeah it's funny I was talking with
63:58
Richard lush who lives in Sydney now
64:00
he's one of the Beatles engineers he
64:02
moved here back in the early 70s to set
64:04
up EMI Sydney and we were talking to him
64:07
a couple of years back and just going
64:10
through a few things and he talked
64:11
about commitment and he mentioned
64:13
working on the soundtrack for the Sydney
64:15
Olympics in 2000 and because he was in
64:18
recording with the engineer using
64:20
ProTools and one of the questions was do
64:23
you want to do another take on that yep
64:25
we're doing it to go give me another
64:26
take so did another take and then the
64:28
engineer turn around and said do you
64:30
want me to keep the other one and he
64:31
said well if I wanted you to keep the
64:32
other one I wouldn't have asked for a
64:34
new one it's all about commitment cuz
64:38
you just end up in the end with like 35
64:40
types of everything and you don't even
64:42
know you just you lost completely lost
64:44
that's all I think that's an issue you
64:46
finding you finding that David that
64:48
that's an issue of people not willing to
64:49
commit oh yeah but it's only an issue if
64:53
the production chooses to make it an
64:55
issue in other words as soon as you
64:58
change the scope like let's say an
65:01
advertiser comes to you robber and says
65:03
here's our ad you know we're gonna give
65:05
you I don't know whatever it cost for
65:07
you to work on an advertisement and and
65:11
then you you do the work and maybe it
65:13
takes a day or two or whatever and then
65:15
they come to you and they go okay well
65:18
here's another cut we want you to do all
65:20
that work again but do it on another cut
65:22
well now of course you're putting more
65:24
time into the production and if they
65:26
don't also come to you and say well we
65:28
should give you more money because
65:29
you're going to spend more time on it
65:30
then that becomes an issue right you got
65:33
to pay the rents like everyone else
65:35
so you know film is the same if if they
65:38
you know like on the on the Patriots Day
65:42
film so I don't know what the sound
65:44
budget was it was hundreds and hundreds
65:46
and hundreds of thousands of dollars
65:47
probably a couple million dollars and
65:49
you know they just had to keep spending
65:52
money because their filmmaker and their
65:53
picture editor and you know the director
65:56
they kept making changes to the cut now
65:59
that's only a problem if they then say
66:01
we're not going to spend any more money
66:02
because then you're like okay well I
66:05
guess just in the tracks to the states
66:07
that are out of sync and you'll have to
66:09
figure it out there but usually what
66:12
happens is you know someone's gonna be
66:14
pretty unhappy in that situation I don't
66:17
know how much more time yeah but I
66:19
to get one more and this might be a
66:20
quickie but I see you do a lot of
66:22
television what is the real difference
66:26
these days now in what you do between
66:29
working for television versus for a
66:31
future I don't really approach it any
66:35
differently it's still storytelling with
66:38
sound happened it's still the same I
66:41
mean obviously the budgets are a little
66:43
different and the schedules are very
66:44
different you know budget is budget and
66:47
you know the creative resources that
66:49
come out of that are affected by those
66:51
two things as in as they are in every
66:54
every job in the world
66:55
so you know TV here in America has done
67:00
certain way and it's very difficult to
67:03
get them to change that way of doing it
67:07
but within that way of doing at their
67:09
structure and reliability and
67:11
consistency which is sometimes a welcome
67:15
change from features because features
67:18
are absolutely derivative of the
67:21
filmmakers personality to an extent and
67:24
if they are a personality that wants to
67:26
keep cutting their film right up to the
67:28
print master then that's going to sort
67:31
of create a certain environment and the
67:34
budget and the number of people involved
67:37
and the amount of time you spend on it
67:39
is is going to change as a result
67:41
whereas television they don't really do
67:45
that although in the last couple of
67:46
years even that has changed you know the
67:50
consistency of television because with
67:52
these Netflix shows you know shows you
67:56
could have been delivered to networking
67:57
networks type networks you know you guys
68:01
probably seen this when you turn on
68:03
Netflix and you go to watch you know a
68:05
Netflix series you can watch the entire
68:08
series in one sitting if you want oh
68:11
yeah I know yeah it's not like it's not
68:14
like regular television ways you know
68:16
episode 1 this week in episode 2 will be
68:19
available next week and so as a result
68:23
like I did a series for Amazon a couple
68:26
of years ago which is a similar to a
68:27
Netflix delivery they deliver as in the
68:30
production delivers to the
68:32
giulio and subsequently the studio - the
68:34
network they deliver the entire series
68:36
on one day so right so you can imagine
68:40
is like an eight-hour movie right so
68:48
you're delivering instead of one hour
68:49
every week you're delivering ten hours
68:52
in one day or in one week now
68:55
usually a smart production will try and
68:58
schedule that so that they are turning
69:00
out one hour every week but going back
69:03
to your question earlier guys if if no
69:06
one makes a decision you could have ten
69:09
unlocked episodes three days from
69:12
delivery yeah like that right yeah so
69:17
that just think differences is schedule
69:19
and you know the way they structure
69:22
their productions do you think because
69:24
the budgets over the years have got
69:26
bigger and there's two different genres
69:29
now it's independent films and there's
69:30
you know big production studio films do
69:34
you find there's more fear involved in
69:37
the big studios I'm not sure if I'm
69:43
really qualified to answer that question
69:45
I mean I you know like the head of a
69:47
studio would be someone who could answer
69:49
that maybe and someone with a sort of a
69:51
perspective on it on the history of
69:53
filmmaking hi I think what is important
69:57
this is just me being the guy that reads
69:59
a lot of stuff about you know like when
70:02
I worked in radio one of the reasons I
70:04
left radio and chose to go and do
70:05
something else well the main reason was
70:07
I wanted to challenge myself creatively
70:09
the number two of maybe the third reason
70:12
why was I had been reading a lot of you
70:15
know the Financial Times and and I read
70:18
a lot of different perspectives on
70:21
business and the marketplace
70:23
and I could see that the radio
70:26
advertising the pie was getting called
70:28
the radio section of the advertising pie
70:31
was getting smaller even in the short
70:33
you know eight nine years that I work in
70:35
radio every time they put up that that
70:38
pie chart which showed you know print
70:40
television newspapers outdoor radio is
70:43
getting smaller every
70:45
here and I was like well this can't be
70:46
good for my job one day they're going to
70:49
get rid of my job because no one's going
70:51
to want to pay for it
70:52
you know yeah right radios radios it's a
70:55
broadcasting medium it's not a creative
70:58
sound medium at least that's not the
71:01
core business you know as part of the
71:03
business you deliver creative sound but
71:05
it's not the business you're in the
71:07
business you're in is selling media time
71:09
or air time so if your air time budget
71:12
is reducing then obviously everything
71:13
else in the station's going to get
71:14
reduced as well because they can't
71:16
handle the overhead so when you look at
71:19
major studios and films it's kind of the
71:22
same thing in addition to you know we've
71:26
had massive market consolidation with
71:27
radio station ownership not only in
71:29
Australia but around the world it's the
71:31
same thing with major studios
71:32
I mean Disney is just about to buy Fox
71:35
who would have thought that would happen
71:37
but it looks like it might happen you
71:39
know so when you look at the
71:43
consolidation of major movie studios the
71:46
only thing that drives that is the
71:50
ability for the marketplace to be able
71:52
to capitalize it and the only market
71:53
place that can capitalize those sort of
71:55
takeovers is the stock market and what
71:57
if the stock market want they want 12 15
72:01
13 percent year-over-year growth you
72:04
don't get that kind of consistent growth
72:07
out of the movie business it's a very
72:09
very up-and-down you know hot and cold
72:11
business one of the ways that the
72:14
studio's choose to minimize their risk
72:16
is by making movies that are derivative
72:19
or sequels of movies they've already
72:21
made before because when they put the
72:23
business model for a movie together they
72:24
say okay you know Batman one made one
72:27
hundred million dollars say well Batman
72:30
2 if even if we make it with you know 30
72:33
50 percent of the production value we're
72:36
still going to get 70% of that audience
72:37
so we can guarantee ourselves seventy
72:39
million dollars return based on 100
72:42
million we made last time so we know
72:44
roughly so there's a reasonably
72:46
consistent business model versus an
72:48
inconsistent business model which is a
72:50
risky movie with a script that and
72:53
characters and story that the audience
72:55
is never seen before and it's quite
72:57
unusual that's a very
72:58
business for a major movie studio sir
73:01
yeah
73:01
Maya in my humble opinion I think the
73:04
thing that drives the big movies and
73:07
they're sort of consistent theme if you
73:09
like or whatever however you phrased it
73:12
it's more who owns the studio's and what
73:16
does that mean for their business and
73:18
how does you know what ROI are those
73:21
equity investors looking for so we're
73:24
basically saying thank goodness that
73:25
George Lucas didn't try and pitch Star
73:27
Wars in 2018 right yeah yeah I know the
73:33
studio that would timing Star Wars was a
73:35
hard movie to make it was incredibly
73:38
difficult and groundbreaking it was
73:41
groundbreaking but it was also really
73:43
really hard for him he it took him a
73:45
long time to make that picture and it
73:49
was a very difficult picture to make and
73:51
I think there were some executives of
73:52
Fox that really took a risk on him as a
73:56
filmmaker and obviously paid off for
73:58
them and paid off for him to be time
74:02
that was 1975 when they dream let that
74:05
film but even back then it was a risky
74:10
yeah oh yeah absolutely but that was I
74:13
mean he basically sold sold his soul to
74:16
the devil to get it through in the first
74:17
place right I know I know he he did a
74:21
good deal on the merchandise that was
74:25
the deal don't pay me to make the movie
74:27
but I want the merchandise rights I
74:29
could be wrong on that something like
74:30
that yeah that's what I seem to remember
74:32
reading yeah but it's the same with
74:35
music though I mean music in the 60s
74:37
through the 70s probably into the 80s
74:40
and maybe early 90s the overhead
74:42
companies were happy to invest that you
74:44
know the first album may not fire the
74:45
second one may not go third one may not
74:47
but the fourth one could hmm and they
74:50
would invest in the future they wouldn't
74:52
just invest in that you know one single
74:54
on Spotify which is basically it now
74:56
yeah that's right well look at John
74:58
Mellencamp we wouldn't have John
74:59
Mellencamp if it wasn't for um what was
75:01
his second record company that picked
75:03
him up can I remember all others
75:05
was it one us yeah whoever it was I mean
75:06
he will CBS had him in the end but yeah
75:08
he was written off basically
75:11
yeah yeah CVS and they also Springsteen
75:14
he was another one that was you know if
75:17
the record companies to ditched him on
75:18
the first two albums I would have been
75:19
it hmm absolutely
75:21
now listen see we can't let you go we
75:23
can't wrapped up this interview without
75:24
getting a bit geeky here talk us through
75:27
talk us through your favorite gear your
75:30
favorite favorite plugins yeah maybe
75:32
some favorite workflows if you've got
75:34
any or just give us some geek gear you
75:37
know I'm actually I had some really cool
75:40
geeky stuff which I just I literally
75:43
sold it all about a year ago you know I
75:46
had outboard rack that I would bring two
75:49
duds and bring two mixes but really in
75:51
the last five years a lot of it's a lot
75:54
of the the technology in the box has
75:56
gotten a lot better I mean I've been
75:57
mixing in the box for a long time not as
76:00
long as some but but a long time and you
76:04
know I don't have it number one I kind
76:07
of don't like audio guys saying hey this
76:09
tool is really good this plug-in is
76:10
really cool because then everyone goes
76:12
and uses it and then thinks that they
76:13
can get the sound yes may or may not
76:16
yeah you know being well known for and I
76:19
don't think you know that the number one
76:22
thing is always your ears and second to
76:26
that or maybe primary to that is the
76:28
monitoring environment I was down in
76:30
Perth at the end of last year and I did
76:33
a talk for the Australian screen sound
76:35
guild and someone asked me roughly the
76:37
same question although it was quantified
76:39
in terms of what's your favorite film
76:41
mixing console my response was and it's
76:44
the same for plugins and it's the same
76:46
for I mean I have to work in Pro Tools
76:49
because the entire industries on it now
76:51
but but in terms of like consoles and
76:55
plugins and also stuff you know I don't
76:58
have a religion in terms of those things
77:00
to me the most important thing is with
77:03
what room am I going to be in when I'm
77:05
making decisions with my director I have
77:07
my favorite rooms at every studio here
77:10
and I will only work in those rooms at
77:13
those studios and because I can rather
77:17
you're saying yeah I can trust the
77:19
translation of those rooms to a
77:21
theatrical environment or to a home
77:23
environment
77:24
so let me take I did that that's an
77:26
exact inverse or the the mirror image of
77:29
what I tell all the voice actors you
77:32
know when they say what's the mic and
77:34
I'm like there's a mic get the room
77:37
right you know it's the exact it's the
77:40
same thing the room has to be right and
77:42
the voice to go to go with the room and
77:44
then I'm just performing to number one
77:47
in the in the in the the room or the
77:51
environment is secondary but number one
77:53
is performance if you can't get the
77:54
right performance then good luck tracks
77:56
I mean you'll never get the sound right
77:57
you'll never get it to sound good enough
77:59
for the client if the performance
78:01
doesn't work well your poly sense heard
78:03
is that what you're saying raisi
78:04
[Laughter]
78:08
that that two weeks of ADR down in
78:11
jakarta and we're working some pretty
78:12
kind of not-so-great ADR facilities cuz
78:16
chica jakarta is not a big filmmaking
78:18
community and yet we got really really
78:20
good performances and as a result the
78:24
filmmaker loved everything that happened
78:26
in his track you know once we go back to
78:28
LA and mixed it and you know there was a
78:30
little bit of oh gee this isn't a
78:33
beautiful recording but that didn't
78:34
matter the performance was there it's
78:36
funny I heard it quote from a recording
78:38
engineer and the question was asked
78:41
again what's you know what you fight
78:42
what what do you use you know what
78:44
microphones do you use what preamps do
78:46
you use what desk views and he said I
78:48
use whatever's there yeah that the truth
78:51
yeah I'm kind of I've worked on Harrison
78:55
you phonics obviously avid I did makes
79:00
no difference to me
79:01
I did I did a re-recording course at
79:04
afters here well Jesus back when there
79:08
was first to end when you did that yeah
79:10
and and they had a beautiful old
79:11
Harrison 12 in the in the room and man I
79:14
mean I you know I haven't worked on a
79:16
lot of big consoles like that probably
79:18
one or two but wow that was a sweet ride
79:20
that's for sure yeah yeah we got the
79:22
forgotten EQ that's a great River EQ in
79:26
it yeah that's right and speaking of
79:28
which I remember you used to have a
79:30
pultec EQ do you still add that no I
79:33
sold out when I left Australia
79:35
you fool yeah it was beautiful eyes just
79:40
just to fill you in ice to freelance
79:41
when rains he had his business I
79:43
I quit radio not long after rains he and
79:45
he used to get me into come and do some
79:46
work for him at night and man I used to
79:49
love that thing that was gorgeous
79:52
my head like I said I had up until
79:55
recently in my dialogue chain here and
79:58
some hardware a hardware rack with you
80:00
know some needs I had like six Neve
80:03
units and just some really cool
80:07
expensive it was like a fifty thousand
80:09
dollar rack and one of the things that
80:12
made me change is working in Atmos you
80:15
can't be locked to a dialog chain that's
80:19
limited in the number of channels which
80:21
surely a expensive rack will limit you
80:25
when you're mixing in at most and if you
80:28
guys know what that noise is
80:30
that's the Dolby nine twelve channel
80:33
surround system is a delivery it's a
80:38
delivery medium but also a number of
80:42
channels in Mendota Commons but
80:43
basically it's up to 128 channels of
80:46
sound as opposed to traditional film or
80:49
traditional in the last 15 20 years as
80:52
being either 5.1 or 7.1 sound there's
80:57
many many more channels and a great
80:59
example of an at mas mix and what people
81:01
do with them is the movie gravity that
81:03
film had you know had dialogue coming
81:06
off the screen and going around behind
81:08
you if you don't have a dialogue chain
81:12
that is able to be multiplied many times
81:14
over then you can't do that kind of
81:17
movement with a soundtrack try doing
81:20
that on a panel so I've mentioned the
81:26
Harrison 12 I I picture that I don't
81:29
know if I've ever seen one but isn't
81:30
that one of those quite large format
81:32
yeah consoles that are in the remix yeah
81:34
that's right say the course I was
81:36
talking about was a remix in course at
81:38
the and afters is the Australian film
81:40
television and radio school and I took
81:42
myself off to do that
81:45
mostly because I wanted to learn about
81:47
surround sound and this
81:48
Jesus late 90s people just when they
81:50
were talking about you know
81:52
surround-sound starting to hit TV and
81:53
all that sort of stuff so that's that's
81:55
why I took myself off to do that course
81:56
but yeah they had this beautiful big old
81:58
Harrison 12 and the mixing stage that
82:00
the film television and radio school was
82:02
a pleasure to work with that's for sure
82:03
where do you like to go see a film
82:05
because you like the way the speaking of
82:07
rooms other than playing a back of film
82:09
in your favorite room at Warner Brothers
82:11
where do you like to go in LA where you
82:13
really like the sound in the theatre
82:15
when I'm in LA I my wife and I are to go
82:18
if when we go out to a film we are to go
82:21
to a screening at the studio's because
82:23
we know they've all all their rooms if
82:25
they're doing a screening have been you
82:27
know proper their projection is is
82:29
correct of course if not then our second
82:34
choice is the ArcLight
82:35
because once again they generally have
82:37
projection pretty well sorted out but
82:41
lightly we just finished building a
82:43
little home theater slash sound design
82:46
room in our house we've got a sacred
82:49
structure at the back of our property
82:51
and I we put our little home theater
82:53
thing in there so lightly we'd be
82:54
watching films in there because it just
82:55
you know I did all the acoustic design
82:57
on that and it's it's close enough
82:59
and it's certainly better than the most
83:01
kind of home environments so it's
83:03
lightly been good enough for us
83:06
this is why movie theatres ladies and
83:08
gentlemen have to have giant reclining
83:10
electric seats and all sorts of other
83:12
gimmicks trying to get you to show up
83:14
because we're building these home
83:16
theaters that sound and look the
83:18
sounding and look incredible and that's
83:21
why he sent me a photo studio you should
83:23
say it's very nice in fact I might throw
83:25
it up in the show notes if that's okay
83:26
with you rain Z ah just give us the
83:28
address David Bowie around there like
83:32
three blocks and Warner Brothers I'm
83:35
lucky I get to walk good thing about
83:38
watching films though at home there's
83:40
some films you don't want to watch it
83:42
hug like like a comedy is far more you
83:46
know like a movie like The Hangover it's
83:48
far more enjoyable watching in a movie
83:50
oh yeah environment audience because
83:52
part of that process of enjoying the
83:56
picture is is hearing other people enjoy
83:58
the picture absolutely oh yeah
84:00
I first comedy I remember seeing the
84:02
theater where it really was like oh my
84:04
gosh listen to the audience was there's
84:06
there's something about Mary
84:07
yes out there movie I mean they really
84:11
pushed boundaries of taste and
84:13
everything and the audience like Ajay
84:15
drowned out the dialog like a third of
84:17
the movie have you guys seen a film
84:21
called two hands yes
84:23
no that's a great time
84:26
it's Heath Ledger before Heath Ledger
84:28
was a big Hollywood guy oh yes yes yes
84:35
[Music]
84:38
it's very black comedy and watch I
84:41
watched that film
84:42
I must mean five times in the cinema
84:44
probably because it's a great film and
84:46
also because watching it with an
84:47
audience it's just great yeah George
84:50
jump online and find it and and have a
84:51
look it's an awesome movie yeah yeah
84:53
Brian I am looking Ryan Brown plays that
84:56
perfect gangster yes Bergen gangsters
84:59
great right Brian basically plays black
85:01
Brian Brown he's um that's his signature
85:03
role I reckon dear you know even Netflix
85:10
online auto plays with audio aid website
85:14
yeah and a guy that you guys know Rick
85:19
Carter is in that picture and Rick he's
85:22
a great voiceover guy yeah there's a few
85:24
people pop up in that there's another
85:25
great film actually in that sort of
85:26
genre that was done here in Australia
85:28
and that was getting squared and they've
85:31
yeah they that's great there's a there's
85:34
a great scene it's Richard Roxburgh
85:37
plays this sort of heroin addicts and
85:40
there's the best scene of him it he's
85:43
running down the street in that you know
85:44
he's got the tight foot he shorts on and
85:46
would you would call flip-flops George
85:48
we call them thongs and they seem being
85:51
chased in a pair of thongs running down
85:54
the street and the sound of someone
85:56
running in thongs is so unique and it's
85:58
fantastic you got to see it well listen
86:03
Rosie this has been awesome I thank you
86:04
so much for your time we've probably
86:05
held you up way more way longer than you
86:07
thought we would but um it's been
86:09
awesome to talk to you thanks for your
86:10
time
86:10
no worries guys it's been fun thank you
86:13
if
86:13
I had a case of career Envy that's mine
86:16
yep yes I can understand that
86:20
absolutely the guy to hang out it with
86:22
at some point for sure
86:24
yes George stay you've got your I've got
86:27
your chance a nice guy to show the way
86:29
not just a shot away
86:31
get me shelter yeah yeah no I'd love to
86:35
do that job any day of the week
86:37
yeah but the trouble is if you
86:38
disappeared for two days mmm let's write
86:41
it down a rabbit hole yeah you'd never
86:44
emerge you know be gone gone for good
86:47
what's said in blood in in the hangover
86:50
what is Bangkok's got him it's in that
86:52
case it's Hollywood's got him yes that's
86:54
right yeah well there you go they goes
86:58
another show hopefully we've been
87:00
slightly informative hopefully something
87:03
in there somewhere surely for someone
87:05
yeah I'm still I'm still amazed about
87:08
Red October yes how they the audio when
87:11
they had to do it or plant all the
87:12
microphones that is insane he's crazy
87:15
fly live mixing a movie of that standing
87:18
that's crazy
87:19
yeah just one mistake they'll take you
87:21
outside and shoot you no pressure no
87:24
pressure and let's face it Sean Connery
87:27
is licensed to kill so you know and and
87:31
licensed to wear a week and have a
87:32
really bad Russian accent ooh Polaski
87:38
yeah so there you go Oh what what so
87:42
Ames I'm sorry come on
87:44
it's definite I'm sure you're just
87:45
trying to end the dang show and I have
87:47
to add something but I was a moment to
87:51
to as I was reading recording hacks
87:55
earlier up popped an ad and I clicked on
87:58
it and it's for antelope audio tying up
88:01
the the emulating microphone thing or
88:04
modeling mic they have their own it's
88:05
called the edge and it seems to go with
88:09
that same sphere audio design where it's
88:11
got stereo output it has to capsule
88:14
output uses a five pin XLR and then goes
88:19
on out and goes into their own system
88:23
and beyond that I don't know anything
88:25
about it because I just discovered it
88:26
but as you can
88:27
see that this is becoming a trend in mic
88:30
design and I'm sure gonna see a lot more
88:32
of this in the next year right right uh
88:36
time to put the microphones back in
88:38
their dust cover and it disappeared for
88:42
another week or so hopefully they won't
88:43
collect too much dust otherwise we'll be
88:45
out of money deal that's true talking
88:47
about dust covers so I wear the the 41
88:50
six that's because I'm getting bit lazy
88:54
that is the finally he's pretty well all
88:56
the time now that funny
88:57
it's just easy just easy I'll mentum
88:59
besides we've given it a we've given it
89:02
a cool name now - yeah sounds warts car
89:05
now it does yeah that's fine yeah yep
89:11
[Music]
89:21
be tickled to death to tell don't cry
89:25
don't sigh there's a silver lining in
89:29
the sky don't swallow thing cheerio chin
89:33
chin Naju toodaloo goodbye